BBC bosses are set to ‘learn lessons’ after losing privacy battle with Sir Cliff Richard


BBC bosses are keen to “learn lessons” after they lost a privacy battle with Sir Cliff Richard.

Head of news Fran Unsworth emailed staff after Wednesday’s High Court verdict to say: “I believe all our journalists acted in good faith.”

Sir Cliff Richard won £200,000 in damages after suing the BBC for its coverage of a police raid on his home in 2014
Sir Cliff Richard won £200,000 in damages after suing the BBC for its coverage of a police raid on his home in 2014
Getty Images – Getty

But she admitted: “ We understand the impact that our reporting has on individuals.

“I am keen that we learn lessons from the way we reported the story.

“As I’ve said, we would do some things differently today.

She also said that “significant principles” were at stake.

The head of news for the BBC admitted that there were lessons to be learned
The head of news for the BBC admitted that there were lessons to be learned
Alamy

Pop star Sir Cliff, 77, got £200,000 damages.

He sued over the coverage of a 2014 raid on his Berkshire home by cops investigating a false sex claim.

Lord Patton, ex-head of the defunct BBC Trust, said the Corporation would be “crazy” to appeal.

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He said: “This is not what a public service broadcaster should be doing.

“And I think it would be crazy for the BBC arguing that there is some principle of freedom of speech involved and to appeal this decision.

“I think they should swallow hard, say they made a mistake, apologise as they have to Cliff Richard, move on and not to do it again.”




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